Buoyed by evolution of logistics

charlton pic.png

Tasmanian Logistics Committee chairman Brett Charlton, left, Jim Ertler of Premium Fresh Tasmania, Liberal Senator Richard Colbeck and Chairman of Regional Development Australia – Tasmania, Tom Black encourage businesses to use the TFES.

Never before have I seen such a buoyant time for international traders in Tasmania.

From a shipping point of view we have a new Sea Road vessel and another one ordered, two new Toll vessels about to be rolled into the water, orders for new TT Line ferries, MSC announcing that they are swinging their Asian service into Bell Bay, Maersk line calling into Bell Bay, Swires calling into Hobart and the likes of CMA CGM, ANL, PIL, OOCL, Hambug Sud and Cosco all servicing Tasmania via feeder services.

These are the largest shipping lines in the world – all with confidence to invest and compete their services into Tasmania. Not bad for a population of 500,000!

Sustainable?  It seems to be so far.

I recently attended the opening of the Australian office for JD.com. JD.com is the third largest internet company on the planet after Google and Apple – I wonder who reading this has even heard of JD.com?

It is really interesting to see the evolution of logistics in other countries and the world of e-commerce logistics in China never ceases to amaze me.

At a luncheon hosted by JD.com the President and the Chief Technical Officer (CTO) were discussing how they are missing out on a percentage of the market in China due to the difficulties of delivery – I may be wrong, but I think the number stated was around 20 million people.

The solution for delivery to these people off the beaten track – drones of course.

The thing is, when I consider the conversation of drones being used for delivery in Australia I think in terms of “that is so far away I won’t get to see it” whereas in China it is “yep, we have tested that and it should be up and running in six months”.

The President was talking to the last Iphone release . He spoke of queues of people waiting outside Apple shops in the USA and Australia for their Iphone to be available when the shop opens. In Beijing all of the Iphone X’s were delivered within 45 minutes of the phone being available – that is at 0045hrs in the morning – delivered to the door. Not only that, the next sentence was about how they are looking to reduce the times even more with automated delivery vehicles.

Meanwhile, I would encourage all readers to go to the Regional Development Australia (Tasmania) web site (rdatasmania.org.au) and download a copy of the Tasmanian Freight Equalisation Scheme (TFES) case study report.

Mike Bridley (the author) has written an excellent document on how the extension to the TFES for export cargoes has created opportunities, growth and employment for Tasmanian businesses. Please pass on this report to your staff, friends and colleagues so that this important aspect of Tasmania’s success continues to support our growth.

By Agility Logistics Tasmanian General Manager Brett Charlton

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s